Battling Lupus

The Official Rules of Dating While "Dating" Your Chronic Illness by Shanelle Gabriel

With doctor visits, prescription pick-ups, bed rest, and flares, who has time for dating??? While the idea of "searching for the one" seems to have been replaced by searching for the right rheumatologist or specialist, you and I both know that there's a part of us that would like a special someone in our lives. But how do we date when we seem to have baggage from our relationship with our chronic illness?
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Cool Events for My Friends with Lupus (Education Sessions, Free Yoga and Aquatic Tai Chi Classes, and Nutrition Certificate Program) by Shanelle Gabriel

Here are some cool events for my Friends with Lupus, my fellow Lupies! (Education Sessions, Free Yoga and Aquatic Tai Chi Classes, and Nutrition Certificate Program)
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Podcast of My Interview on "In Sickness & In Health- Dating Someone With a Chronic Illness" on The Naked Radio Show by Shanelle Gabriel

In this podcast, we explore how far someone will go for love when their partner gets sick or is dealing with a serious medical condition. Singer/poet/actress Shanelle Gabriel steps into the hot seat to share her struggles with lupus and how the disease has not only impacted her health but her dating life since being diagnosed.
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13.1 has new meaning for me... Running the 2012 NYC Half Maratho by Shanelle Gabriel

I earned this tattoo....



I know, I know, it's a temporary one but I earned the right to wear it. On Sunday, March 19th, 2012, I ran 13.1 miles in the NYC Half Marathon. I did this to raise money for the SLE Lupus Foundation and also to show that even though I'm living with Lupus, I can still accomplish an amazing physical goal.

My day started at 5:30am. Even though I prepared the night before by putting out all my clothes and carb loading at a pasta party my running group Black Girls Run threw, I still felt like I was scrambling. This endeavor had me more nervous than I've ever been, even at a show. "What could go wrong? Just finish. That's all that matters." I encouraged myself and checked my twitter & FB for encouragement from others.


Once the race started, I felt like an ant in an ant farm; there were so many people scattering in the same direction. My biggest fear in this race was the first 6 miles in Central Park. I truly felt unprepared for the plethora of random stupid hills all over the park. Due to my busy schedule over the last few weeks, I missed official Team Life Without Lupus trainings in the park, and man, by the time I got to the 7th Ave exit, my right foot was pissed at me.

People asked me if I stopped at all. Yes, a few times. To replenish at the gatorade/water stations, to re-tie my laces, once to use the port-a-johns (you don't wanna know why), and to stretch out random stiff parts of my body. At one point in time, my foot, lower back, left hip, and chest were all on fire. As I watched a one-legged man with a sporty artificial limb breeze past me (I was one part amazed, two parts embarassed at my slow pace), I sucked it up and focused on the end.


As I made my way down 7th Ave to 42nd Street to the West Side Highway, I was proud to be one of the people being cheered on. It was great seeing my BGR sisters waving banners along the route as well as the random folk giving high-fives as you passed them by. One sign stood out:

"Run like you stole something."

If that was the case, I'd have gotten caught. By the time I got to the 20s on the West Side Highway, I swore I was gonna need to be carried off course if I ran at the pace everyone else was. So I slowed down to a simple lil jog. Besides, everyone around me was running FOR a cause. Darnit, I AM the cause. No killing myself.

I was a lil jealous of the people who's families had cardboard signs with runner's names on it, but I remembered, I'm not running for anyone other than myself and people like me, many of which couldn't be there.

The last mile was gruesome. The final incline to get through the tunnel near the Battery Tunnel to the highway exit for South Street Seaport was murderous on my foot but I got through it, and jogged as best as I could to get to Water Street where the race ended. I crossed the finish line and almost laid out right In the street. My friend Gigi from college was there waiting for me. They gave all participants a medal, water, pretzels, an apple and a foil sheet to wrap around our bodies to keep us warm.

At the end of the day, I am able to say that as a person with Lupus, I reached my goal of running 13.1 miles to show that at the end of the day, LUPUS CAN'T HOLD ME! I did this while my friend Olympia is in the hospital, Adrienne fights every day for the energy to just get through work, Judith works to find new medication while creating a non-profit to help people deal with Lupus in Ghana, and while many others battle the same battle I fight daily with health insurance companies, medications, rest, complications, and more. I hope this run made someone who is battling Lupus smile. I did it for you! 

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know by Shanelle Gabriel

Many prominent bloggers were asked to participate in this simple blog post to help spread awareness during Invisible Awareness Week (September 11-18th). I'm a lil late, but I still wanted to contribute, especially since many invisible illnesses, like Lupus, don't get the press or attention they deserve. 

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know

 
1. The illness I live with is: Systematic Lupus.  

2. I was diagnosed with it in the year: I was diagnosed in July 2004, right after my Sophomore year.

3. But I had symptoms since: I remember the serious ones beginning in 2003 (migranes, joint pain, stiffness in the morning, and more). I'd had many of the symptoms for a while but I chalked it up to being a college student, being achy from my dance troupe, even from being a female. But when I lost my hair in June, that's when I couldn't deny something was wrong.

4. The biggest adjustment I’ve had to make is: not being able to rip and run 24/7 the way I used to. I'd feel guilty for not helping everyone, for saying no, or for not supporting every event out there. Now I have to balance more than the average person, relying on naps and rest days to keep myself healthy. I have to listen to my body or risk being achy and flared up the next day (or few days).

5. Most people assume: that I don't have my insecurities about the illness. I worry that I will get worse, that I'll develop more accompanying complications, that I'll have trouble having kids, or that it will effect my quality of life. I stay positive and try not to let the illness take over my life, but I have my fears.

6. The hardest part about mornings are: the initial wake-up process. There are days when I'm perfectly fine, and others when it takes a mental yell to my joints to get them to move. Also, how I wake up can actually determine the kind of morning I'll have. I've been abruptly waken up or had a REALLY high anxiety dream, and woke up so tense that it put me in a flare for the whole morning even achy till the afternoon.

7. My favorite medical TV show is: House. I always get excited when they say "Maybe it's an autoimmune disease? Lupus? Start them on 60mg of Prednisone." I'm like, "Yea, I take that too!!!" lol.

8. A gadget I couldn’t live without is: my cell phone. I handle EVERYTHING with it: phone, scheduling, poem/songwriting, business, etc. I swear, I've forgotten my mom's birthday because it wasn't in my phone calendar.

9. The hardest part about nights are: not always being able to enjoy the nightlife. I wish I could party till the sun comes up, but in most cases, unless I get a serious nap in, I'm super drained for at least a day or two. My body takes so long to recover. I also hate how drained I am at the end of the day...damn near narcoleptic. 

10. Each day I take: 10 pills & vitamins. (Trying to get off of prednisone... sigh)

11. Regarding alternative treatments I: believe in a healthy combination of both. I think the idea of totally ignoring western medicine is crazy. If something goes wrong, best believe you aren't going to a herbalist. However, it's also crazy to think that an illness INSIDE of you isn't effected by our diet or an influx of meds in your system. I detox and take supplimental herbs & teas in hopes of finding a balance in my body.

12. If I had to choose between an invisible illness or visible I would choose: I would choose to have an invisible illness. In the beginning I hated telling people I had Lupus because it made some people treat me like I was an invalid. I can only imagine if it was visable. It'd be more likely to control my life. However, it does make it hard to explain to others when you're feeling sick.

13. Regarding working and career: I've become such a structured person. It helps me get work done when I need to. Also, being diagnosed with Lupus made me see how valuable life is and how important it is to do what you love. It helped me choose my career.

14. People would be surprised to know: that I have used Lupus to get myself out of some sticky situations. I don't like to do that because I feel like that puts out bad karma that will come back to bite me later.

15. The hardest thing to accept about my new reality has been: thinking of myself as a person with an illness. Prior to Lupus, I'd never even been to the ER. Except for one minor surgery, I never saw a doctor for more than a check-up and ringworm when I was 12. Now, I see my rheumatologist every month, different specialists every few months, giving everyone damn near a pint of blood each visit. I can't always get everything I want to accomplish done, and I have to think about things that "normal" 20 something year olds don't. Yet, my mind is the same healthy person it believed it was before I even knew what Lupus was. 

16. Something I never thought I could do with my illness that I did was: live a normal life. It took a while to realize that there is no such thing as a "normal" life. We are all given our own obstacles and trials to deal with, some more than others, but not without our gifts, blessings, and the ability to find light in dark situations. It's our job to take OUR lives and make it a meaningful, amazing, and love-filled experience. 

17. The commercials about my illness: There are no commercials for Lupus, but I was excited to see a few print ads throughout NYC. Lupus is the disease where many have heard of it or know someone with it, but have no clue what it is. Hopefully more awareness can happen in the future.

18. Something I really miss doing since I was diagnosed is: organized dance. It always feels like I'm putting so much strain on my body when I push it to get choreography or do too much jumping. I still take a few classes from time to time. 

19. It was really hard to have to give up: not being invincible. Many of us think we can treat our body like a machine, overwork it and play it till it's run down. It's what we're told life is. "We'll sleep when we're dead." For a person with an illness, we can't afford to treat our bodies that way. I miss the freedom of being able to just wild out, but in the same breath, I have learned the true value of optimal health and taking care of the gift God has given me: my body. 

20. A new hobby I have taken up since my diagnosis is: I'm a movie girl... Netflix is my way to relax and get lost in the plot of another world.

21. If I could have one day of feeling normal again I would: I would spend an entire day outdoors, in the sun, exercising, eating grapefruit (as much as I love it, some of my medications conflict with it), and dancing.

22. My illness has taught me: Value your health and love life!

23. Want to know a secret? One thing people say that gets under my skin is: "Why are you taking that medication? Oh, I know a cure for Lupus. Just go to this website about this doctor in the East Congo/ France/ India/ etc." I'm so tired of people, who aren't medical doctors, trying to tell me what I'm doing wrong and that they know how to make everything ALL go away. While I do practice elements of Eastern/Alternative medicine, I cannot completely abandon Western medicine. I know you mean well but stop trying to fix me, people!

24. But I love it when people: open up to me. I appreciate the kind words, the understanding, the laughs, the deep discussions. It doesn't just have to be about Lupus. Sometimes just remembering how a like we all are can brighten my day.

25. My favorite motto, scripture, quote that gets me through tough times is: "There is always someone out there who has it worse than you do; count all of your blessings." Puts things in perspective.

26. When someone is diagnosed I’d like to tell them: to learn how to listen to their bodies (it'll let you know when to expect a flare), to make sure they fully take an active role in understanding & managing their disease, never be afraid to go to the doctor, and to always stay positive. The mind is a powerful thing. 

27. Something that has surprised me about living with an illness is: that you can actually LIVE with one. So many people think life ends when bad things happen, but there is SO MUCH worth living for. I really value every moment I get and I'm proud of how strong I've been in dealing with this disease. I surprise myself constantly.

28. The nicest thing someone did for me when I wasn’t feeling well was: surprised me with a massage. I thought we were just going to hang out and I ended up at a spa. My joints felt so amazing afterwards.  

29. I’m involved with Invisible Illness Week because: so many people ask me questions about this disease. Although I'm a week late, I still want to do my part in spreading awareness that you don't have to look ill to be ill. Also, I want people to know that just because you're ill, doesn't mean you have to live your life as a sickly person.

30. The fact that you read this list makes me feel: optimistic!

My Battle With Lupus- Part 2: The Happy Doctor with the Diagnosis by Shanelle Gabriel

In honor of Lupus Awareness Month, I'm telling my Lupus story in a series of blogs throughout this week. I'll speak about being diagnosed, complications, my personal battle, as well as where I am with Lupus now. Hopefully this will give some insight on what Lupus is and the way it impacts a person's life. This is Part 2
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May is Lupus Awareness Month... Here's My Lupus Story (Part 1) by Shanelle Gabriel

In honor of Lupus Awareness Month (and World Lupus Day- May 10th), I'm telling my Lupus story in a series of blogs throughout this week. I'll speak about being diagnosed, complications, my personal battle, as well as where I am with Lupus now. Hopefully this will give some insight on what Lupus is and the way it impacts a person's life.
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