food

New Poem: "My Love Feeds on Your Love" by Shanelle Gabriel

A poem from my show "Slam 103: Historical Remix" for the Lincoln Center Meet the Artist Series


Inspired by Pablo Neruda's "If You Forget Me"

"My love feeds on your love, beloved,

and as long as you live

it will be in your arms

without leaving mine. "


 

 

I can't lie...

It's true...

I've got a BIG appetite

I crave random things all the time

On any given night peanut butter and jelly is what I crave

These days guacamole is all the rage

I’m always hungry

My belly a bottomless pit

My mom swore I had a tapeworm

I tried to explain it

Was just something I was born with

I'm always hungry

Starving...

For love and attention

Thirsty for true affection

From loved ones and strangers

My love feeds on your love

Wishing I didn't have this constant

Gnawing at my being

Wishing I could be one of those people

Who don't need people

Seem to be so full of themselves that they're always full with themselves

No room for anyone else

But I know the truth

No matter how hard they try to deny,

The craving strikes

See we were created to love

To love love

Not to live on bread and water alone

But on living connection

We need friendship like oxygen

In a world where to feed on

The need for engagement with humanity is called weak

A world where to expect people to fuel your life with love

is considered vanity

To admit you just want to be wrapped in someone's arms

held tight and told everything will be alright

Is not low self-esteem

It's a part of our being

My love feeds on your love

And your love on mine

Our happiness hangs on how much good we can give to others

How many prayers we can answer for the Divine

My love feeds on your love

So learn to savor the way kind words

Tastes on your lips

As long as you live

Let morsels of hate roll off your plate

Don't be afraid to open your table

To put your heart in someone's arms

Cause no matter how hungry you might be

Someone else out there is starved

We all feel awkward

Get lonely

Think no one understands

The pain we feel

Hurt people tend to hurt people

But through healing others

Our own hearts can heal

And the world may run out of guacamole

Peanut butter and jelly

But I can say with certainty

The passion in your pot

Will never run empty

May the spoon of your tongue

Always ready to serve words

To be heard by someone

Who needs a lil somethin somethin

To get them through

A bad day and a tough time

Tell them

My heart, my soul, my love

It will be yours, in your arms

without ever leaving mine.


"Is Junk Food Really Cheaper?" By Mark Bittman by Shanelle Gabriel

THE “fact” that junk food is cheaper than real food has become a reflexive part of how we explain why so many Americans are overweight, particularly those with lower incomes. I frequently read confident statements like, “when a bag of chips is cheaper than a head of broccoli ...” or “it’s more affordable to feed a family of four at McDonald’s than to cook a healthy meal for them at home.”

This is just plain wrong. In fact it isn’t cheaper to eat highly processed food: a typical order for a family of four — for example, two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries, and two medium and two small sodas — costs, at the McDonald’s a hundred steps from where I write, about $28. (Judicious ordering of “Happy Meals” can reduce that to about $23 — and you get a few apple slices in addition to the fries!)

In general, despite extensive government subsidies, hyperprocessed food remains more expensive than food cooked at home. You can serve a roasted chicken with vegetables along with a simple salad and milk for about $14, and feed four or even six people. If that’s too much money, substitute a meal of rice and canned beans with bacon, green peppers and onions; it’s easily enough for four people and costs about $9. (Omitting the bacon, using dried beans, which are also lower in sodium, or substituting carrots for the peppers reduces the price further, of course.)

Another argument runs that junk food is cheaper when measured by the calorie, and that this makes fast food essential for the poor because they need cheap calories. But given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few, measuring food’s value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink’s value by its alcohol content. (Why not drink 95 percent neutral grain spirit, the cheapest way to get drunk?)

Besides, that argument, even if we all needed to gain weight, is not always true. A meal of real food cooked at home can easily contain more calories, most of them of the “healthy” variety. (Olive oil accounts for many of the calories in the roast chicken meal, for example.)In comparing prices of real food and junk food, I used supermarket ingredients, not the pricier organic or local food that many people would consider ideal. But food choices are not black and white; the alternative to fast food is not necessarily organic food, any more than the alternative to soda is Bordeaux.

The alternative to soda is water, and the alternative to junk food is not grass-fed beef and greens from a trendy farmers’ market, but anything other than junk food: rice, grains, pasta, beans, fresh vegetables, canned vegetables, frozen vegetables, meat, fish, poultry, dairy products, bread, peanut butter, a thousand other things cooked at home — in almost every case a far superior alternative.

“Anything that you do that’s not fast food is terrific; cooking once a week is far better than not cooking at all,” says Marion Nestle, professor of food studies at New York University and author of “What to Eat.” “It’s the same argument as exercise: more is better than less and some is a lot better than none.”

THE fact is that most people can afford real food....

(Read the rest of the article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/opinion/sunday/is-junk-food-really-cheaper.html?_r=4&ref=opinion)